Shhh… Sneak Peek at the new Ryan Reed bracelet

Shhh… Sneak Peek at the new Ryan Reed bracelet

RyanReedBandIn conjunction with the recent partnering with NASCAR driver Ryan Reed and the American Diabetes Association’s Drive to Stop Diabetes℠ for 2014 presented by Lilly Diabetes, American Medical ID is proud to preview the new Ryan Reed medical ID bracelet, which should become available mid-March.  As American Medical ID has done with past campaign awareness bracelets, a percentage of sales will be donated to the American Diabetes Association.

D1412SLilly-06620 year old Ryan Reed is an incredibly talented driver who never let his diabetes diagnosis slow him down.   After being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in February 2011, during the height of his racing career, Ryan’s approach in his life, career, and goals in racing changed. He found himself in a unique situation and was driven to become a role model in the diabetes community.  Reed joined forces with the American Diabetes Association, and drives the No. 16 Drive to Stop Diabetes presented by Lilly Diabetes Roush Fenway Racing Ford Mustang.  Reed, a Bakersfield, California native, is believed to be the first full-time NASCAR national series driver with type 1 diabetes.

The American Diabetes Association is leading the fight to Stop Diabetes® and its deadly consequences and fighting for those affected by diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. The Drive to Stop Diabetes℠ campaign includes awareness and educational efforts at select NASCAR Nationwide races, as well as at several off track health and wellness initiatives.

The American Diabetes Association recommends all persons with diabetes have a medical ID with you at all times.  Medical IDs are usually worn as a bracelet or a necklace. Traditional IDs are etched with basic, key health information about the person, and some IDs now include compact USB drives that can carry a person’s full medical record, such as the fact that they have diabetes and use insulin.  Emergency medical personnel are trained to look for a medical ID.