Taking Blood Thinners? Learn the #1 Safety Precaution

Taking Blood Thinners? Learn the #1 Safety Precaution

What is the #1 safety precaution if you are taking a blood thinner? A medical identification bracelet. It’s a simple, but effective intervention that all patients should consider.

If you are currently taking a blood thinner, your doctor has probably recommended it to help prevent a stroke or heart attack. Common blood thinners include: Coumidin, Plavix and Warafin, although blood thinners are marketed under a variety of different pharmaceutical names. In general, they are all considered anticoagulants because they can prevent clotting in the arteries and the veins. They are important and life saving medications.

But even medications carry risks when prescribed with other medications. Blood thinners can have serious (even fatal) side effects when they interact with other medications. For this reason, a physician needs to know exactly what you are taking and why. Unfortunately, most people assume they will be able to let the physician know this information themselves, in the event of an emergency situation.

The truth, however, is that sometimes an emergency leaves a patient unconscious, temporarily incapacitated, or simply unable to communicate. In a true medical emergency, even the steadiest patient can become disorientated and confused. That is why medical bracelets are so important. They can communicate quickly and effectively for you, letting the practitioner know basic, but vital health information.

The American Medical Association considers these bracelets so important, they recommend that all patients consider wearing one. That way, if anything happens to you, a medical provider will know immediately, simply by examining the bracelet, what medications you are taking. Most bracelets are inscribed with other vital statistics, including your name, any allergies, as well as contact information for your personal physician. That way a medical doctor can call your physician immediately to consult about your case.

If you or your loved one is taking a blood thinner, make sure to have an emergency medical ID bracelet. Sometimes, the simplest things are truly the most important. American Medical ID carries a line of medical ID bracelets that are both stylish and functional. Find one that fits your needs or those of someone you care about today!

Exercising Outdoors? Stay Safe with Medical ID Jewelry

Exercise is an important part of staying healthy, and you should also try finding a place to work out outdoors periodically. Not only is the fresh air great for your body, but the change of scenery might motivate you to keep a regular workout schedule. Exercising regularly has great health benefits, but you should also know how to stay safe when exercising outdoors as well. That’s where medical ID jewelry and other precautions can help!

The health benefits of regular exercise

Not only will your quality of life be better without medical complications, but your overall physique will improve with exercise. This increases self-confidence and it allows you to rest better at night, making you ready to take on the day. Your joints will even feel better after regular brisk walks or jogs outside. Exercise allows you to see progress on your goals, and you will live a longer life in most cases.

Great outdoor activities include biking, jogging, rollerblading, hiking, climbing, walking your dog, jump-roping, swimming and more. But if you have a medical condition or are going it alone, make sure to take a proactive approach to safety.

Being safe is just as important

If you are starting to exercise outside, your safety is just as important as reaching your health goals. This is the perfect time to invest in medical ID jewelry. Even though medical ID jewelry should be worn at all times, it is especially important to wear when exercising outdoors alone. If something happens to you while you are walking, biking, running or doing other strenuous activities, you may need assistance. Emergency officials are trained to look for medical ID jewelry. This saves them time and lets them know what type of treatment should be administered.

Even if you don’t have a medical condition, if you get lost while running through a wooded area, winding trail or unfamiliar path, medical ID jewelry can be engraved with your contact information. This way, if something happens to you and you became lost, those helping will know exactly who to contact, no matter how far from home you are. Medical ID jewelry can save lives in more ways than one. And if you are exercising outside, you should always wear one. Find the jewelry or accessory that suits you best at AmericanMedical-ID.com today. They even offer Sportbands and other flexible materials suited to exercise.

Avoid Food Allergy Mishaps with a Medical ID Bracelet

Food allergies cause a variety of symptoms in children and adults alike. However, these allergies can be especially frightening for kids because the food allergy might be discovered at school, daycare or somewhere else that is not under a parent’s supervision. Find out why investing in a medical ID bracelet could save your child’s life and avoid complications.

The seriousness of food allergies in children

Statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show that food allergies in children have risen 18 percent, and schools are now having to adapt to more and more children with special needs. In late March, a Florida school deliberated on how to handle the case of a 6-year-old girl with an unnaturally severe allergy to peanuts. She can’t touch other students who have eaten peanuts, nor can she breathe the same air of a person who has eaten peanuts without suffering from a life-threatening reaction.

Although some parents feel that their kids shouldn’t have to suffer for one child’s disability, the girl’s school is still required to employ a peanut-sniffing dog. Plus, her fellow students must wash their hands after breakfast and lunch before entering the classroom. They are even required to wash out their mouths. This issue has caused many debates over if the child should simply be homeschooled instead. It has also made many other public schools consider how the growing number of food allergies in children could affect their district.

School cafeterias serve a variety of meals to kids every day, and as an example, children with peanut allergies must avoid more than just bags of peanuts. Foods like peanut butter, some ice creams, crackers and even spaghetti sauce could cause an allergic reaction. Depending on the severity of the child’s allergy, just another day in the cafeteria could become a serious emergency.

And according to PeanutAllergy.com, the majority of kids who have a peanut allergy are also allergic to other nuts. It’s also common for children to be allergic to seafood, wheat, milk and more. This increases the need to make school officials, babysitters and other caretaker’s constantly aware of your child’s allergy.

How a medical ID bracelet can make a difference

Children with food allergies should wear a medical ID bracelet anytime they are under the care of someone other than the parent. Even if the school or babysitter is well aware of the allergy, a prominent medical ID bracelet can serve as a perpetual reminder of the child’s allergy. This creates constant awareness and lessens the chances of the child eating a food that might cause an allergic reaction.

Food allergies can cause such adverse effects as rashes, nausea, dark circles under the eyes, skin breakouts, sneezing and even less detectable symptoms like hyperactivity. These reactions could affect your child’s overall happiness at school and his or her grades. Or if the reaction is more severe, a medical ID bracelet could even save your child’s life.

Find a medical ID bracelet that best suits your child’s needs at AmericanMedical-Id.com today.

 

How to Get Reimbursed for a Medical ID Bracelet

If you have any number of health issues that can require immediate medical attention or specialized care, you may already be aware of the benefits of a medical ID bracelet.  Here are some primary examples of people who would benefit from wearing one:

  • People with chronic medical conditions
  • People with moderate to severe allergic reactions
  • Patients prescribed multiple medications
  • Children with developmental disorders
  • Elderly with cognitive disorders

Maybe your doctor has already told you about wearing one, but if not, a physician can tell you if you’re a good candidate for a medical ID bracelet. Wearing one has the potential to save your life. Consider for a moment – if you happen to be unconscious and in need of medical care, you wouldn’t be able to tell the first responders what you’re allergic to or what kind of medication you take. There are a wide variety of medications on the market today, and many of them have the potential to interact with others. Therefore, it’s important to be able to tell your caregivers exactly what you take, what you’re allergic to and any conditions you may have.

Depending on your health plan, your insurance company may reimburse you the cost of a medical ID bracelet.  Your physician can even write you a prescription for one. This is a vital step in getting reimbursed for the cost of a bracelet. The prescription, along with an insurance filing form, will prove to the insurance company the medical necessity of one. American Medical ID has their bracelets’ registration codes on file at their website to ease the process a bit.

If your medical plan doesn’t cover the cost of a bracelet, write a letter to your insurance company. It has to start somewhere. Why not with you? And even if you don’t have insurance, a medical ID bracelet is important and worth the investment. A relatively small cost toward proactively managing your health can save your life in the long run, and that’s worth its weight in gold.

 

 

How to Get Reimbursed for a Medical ID Bracelet

If you have any number of health issues that can require immediate medical attention or specialized care, you may already be aware of the benefits of a medical ID bracelet.  Here are some primary examples of people who would benefit from wearing one:

· People with chronic medical conditions

· People with moderate to severe allergic reactions

· Patients prescribed multiple medications

· Children with developmental disorders

· Elderly with cognitive disorders

Maybe your doctor has already told you about wearing one, but if not, a physician can tell you if you’re a good candidate for a medical ID bracelet. Wearing one has the potential to save your life. Consider for a moment – if you happen to be unconscious and in need of medical care, you wouldn’t be able to tell the first responders what you’re allergic to or what kind of medication you take. There are a wide variety of medications on the market today, and many of them have the potential to interact with others. Therefore, it’s important to be able to tell your caregivers exactly what you take, what you’re allergic to and any conditions you may have.

Depending on your health plan, your insurance company may reimburse you the cost of a medical ID bracelet.  Your physician can even write you a prescription for one. This is a vital step in getting reimbursed for the cost of a bracelet. The prescription, along with an insurance filing form, will prove to the insurance company the medical necessity of one. American Medical ID has their bracelets’ registration codes on file at their website to ease the process a bit.

If your medical plan doesn’t cover the cost of a bracelet, write a letter to your insurance company. It has to start somewhere. Why not with you? And even if you don’t have insurance, a medical ID bracelet is important and worth the investment. A relatively small cost toward proactively managing your health can save your life in the long run, and that’s worth its weight in gold.

 

Diabetics Who Sleep Poorly Have Higher Insulin Resistance

Two new studies on individuals with diabetes have found a potentially troubling link between sleep quality and insulin resistance. The results of both studies suggest that diabetics with poor sleep are more likely to have higher insulin resistance and more trouble controlling their condition.
The lead author of the first study, Kristen Knutson, said, “Poor sleep quality in people with diabetes was associated with worse control of their blood glucose levels.” Diabetics that have problems controlling glucose levels are known to have a higher risk of complications, which leads to a reduced quality of life. These individuals are also shown to have a lower life expectancy than diabetics that have well-controlled blood glucose levels.

The study involved the monitored sleep of 40 diabetics for six nights. All study subjects wore monitors on their wrists during the night, which measured their movements the entire night. Poor sleep quality was determined by two factors; both the information provided by the activity monitors and what the subjects told researchers. Study subjects that told researchers they had a hard time getting to sleep or woke up at least once during the night were determined to have poor sleep quality.

Among the 40 diabetics in the study, those with poor sleep had 23% higher glucose levels in the morning, with 48% higher blood insulin levels. These numbers were used to estimate each person’s insulin resistance. Researchers determined that the diabetics with poor sleep had 82% higher insulin resistance than diabetics with normal quality sleep.

A second study, first published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, looked at African-Americans with type 2 diabetes and their sleep habits. During the study, 161 African-Americans were interviewed about their sleep, after which researchers reviewed the subjects’ medical records and checked their HbA1c tests. An HbA1c test is used to measure long-term blood glucose control and was very useful in the study.

The participants interviewed got an average of six hours of sleep each night. 6% got at least eight hours of sleep and 22% got at least seven hours. Many participants in the study reported poor sleep. The average HbA1c level was 8.3%, which is higher than the 7% recommended by the American Diabetes Association. Individuals that reported at least one diabetes complication also had poor quality sleep which researchers associated with higher HbA1c levels as well. Other participants in the study with the fewest hours of sleep showed the higher HbA1c levels.

This study seems to suggest that more sleep at night, as well as a better quality of sleep, can improve blood glucose control in diabetic individuals. However, more research is needed to prove this finding. Still, it’s a good idea for diabetics to try to get more sleep as other studies have shown sleep deprivation can lead to other health problems.

It’s important to realize that managing diabetes is a full-time job. In addition to proper sleep, managing diabetes can include:

You should check your blood glucose levels regularly and incorporate any advice from your doctor into your daily routine. Although diet and exercise can improve and control blood glucose in the beginning, it may be necessary to take insulin at some point. Discuss any concerns you have with your doctor.

It’s also advised that all diabetics wear a medical ID bracelet. Medical ID bracelets come in all colors and styles today and can speak for you in an emergency. In case of accident, responders may not immediately be able to recognize your symptoms. A survey of emergency responders showed that over 95% check for a medical ID upon arriving at a scene. An ID bracelet can help protect you from potentially harmful medical intervention and allow someone to help you effectively and quickly. Check out the fashionable and functional medical ID jewelry from American Medical ID today!

Mother’s Day Medical ID Bracelets – The Perfect Gift

A Mother’s Day gift can be both attractive and practical. When it is both, it shows thoughtfulness that any mother will appreciate. Nothing is more practical and thoughtful than helping your mother stay safe. Medical ID bracelets are perfect gifts for Mother’s Day. They are stylish, and they will be greatly appreciated if ever needed in an emergency.

In a medical emergency, anyone, including your mother, may not be able to express her needs or be able to speak. A medical ID bracelet will communicate necessary medical information to first responders in a concise, easy way. Medical personnel are trained to look for medical ID bracelets before giving treatment.

A description of medical information permanently engraved on an attractive piece of jewelry does not need to call attention to itself. In fact, a fashionable bracelet will complement an outfit and be unobtrusive. It is a discrete accessory that can be a lifesaver when it put to medical use.

No matter how fancy or plain the ID bracelet is, it should list pertinent medical information about the wearer. This includes the:

  • Presence of insulin-dependent diabetes
  • Cardiac conditions
  • The use of anticoagulants
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • Anemia
  • Pulmonary conditions
  • Kidney disease
  • Pertinent medical history

Another vital piece of information that will inform medical staff of possible complications is the presence of allergies to drugs, food or insects. When a patient cannot speak for herself, the bracelet will let medical staff know what conditions may cause complications to emergency care.

Stainless steel, sterling silver or gold-tone metals are suitable for daily wear in every situation. A mother does not need to feel like she is wearing a badge just because she has a medical condition. Wearing unobtrusive jewelry to provide medical information in an emergency is a smart choice.

Special Mother’s Day Sale

American Medical ID offers medical ID bracelets that are made of fine metals and may include accessories like heart-shaped charms for a stylish touch. Get your mother a Mother’s Day gift to last a lifetime by visiting American Medical ID today.

Now until May 8th, take 20% off your entire purchase*.  Enter code PC509 at checkout to redeem. (*10kt and 14kt gold items receive 5% off)

American Medical ID Affiliate Program Changes

American Medical ID Logo

We’re pleased to announce that American Medical ID is switching our Affiliate Program to the HasOffers network.

Why Should I Promote American Medical ID?

Becoming an American Medical ID Online Affiliate can put easy money in your wallet or your organization’s budget. More importantly, this program can put those people at ease whose medical condition or allergy makes them susceptible to emergency. You may even help save a life!

Why Are We Switching Our Program?

Our legacy tracking software had become too slow, unreliable and extremely costly to maintain. After researching the many options we have elected to use HasOffers due to their simple interface and robust reporting.  This will be much easier for our affiliates to help promote our line of medical identification products.

How Much Can I Earn?

You will earn 10% commission on sales referred by your site via the provided tracking link.

I Am Already An American Medical ID Affiliate, Do I Have To Switch To HasOffers?

Yes, we are in the process of phasing out our existing network.  We will require you to be fully running on the HasOffers network and have your links changed by 5/31/2011. After that date, the current affiliate program will be disabled and any links that haven’t been updated may not receive credit for affiliate sales.

Will You Continue To Provide Banners?

Yes, our banners will be available, along with other marketing creatives, in your affiliate account dashboard. You will not have to host your own banners, as HasOffers will host them for you via their cloud based network.

How Do I Get Signed Up?

1. Get signed up for our Affiliate Program HERE.
2. We will review all applications and you will be notified when accepted.
3. Once accepted, make sure you submit your W-9 to us.
4. Review our Program Terms & Conditions.

How Are My Earnings Sent To Me?

We will issue you a Check sent via U.S. Mail.

 

Easily Distracted? Learn a Few Tips to Get Focused

Focusing on something for an extended period of time may be difficult for you. If you are experiencing a lack of concentration and are feeling overwhelmed by distractions, you may be able to improve your focus following these simple tips:focus

  • The world can wait

Your laptop glares at you across the desk while your phone dings with a new text. The Facebook feed updates so fast that you can’t take your eye off the screen or you’ll miss a brand new status. All these priorities never give you a rest, and your brain is constantly urging you to take one. Technology is changing the world for the better, but it also could be stressing you out without you realizing it. Close your laptop or turn your phone on silent for a while. Take a breather. Even a quick walk can help you refocus.

  • Get some shut-eye

Insufficient sleep can also cause your mind to race. Try to go to bed around the same time every night, and if your work schedule varies, set your alarm anyway. A set sleep schedule will not only ensure that you’re getting your eight hours, but it also trains your body and sets sleep patterns.

  • Find your true calling

It’s never too late to make a new career move if you’re unhappy at work. You’ll be happier and much more productive if you love what you’re doing. Make sure that the work is something you’ll enjoy before applying. Play to your strengths and find a job that you can excel at. You will be more productive and focused if you enjoy your job.

It’s also a smart idea to invest in medical alert jewelry if you are diagnosed with a disorder like ADHD. This can be anything from a bracelet to a dog tag you wear under your shirt. Although ADHD isn’t life threatening, it’s important for medical personnel to know what type of medications you’re taking in the event of an emergency. Having medical alert jewelry could save medical personnel precious time in getting you the help you need. Visit IdentifyYourself.com to find the one that’s right for you.

Dangers of Dementia: Wandering

elderly man wanderingDementia is common in elderly people, and if you are responsible for taking care of an aging parent with signs of dementia, it is important to be proactive against the dangers associated with this disease. One of the biggest dangers is wandering. The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that more than 60 percent of people with Alzheimer’s wander away from their home or caregiver at some point. Whether the person simply can’t remember the way back home or is looking for something familiar, wandering can be scary for everyone. But with some preparation, you  can help your loved one navigate through this disorder safely.

Identify the patient. The first step to taking care of a person with dementia is to invest in medical alert jewelry and make sure that it is worn at all times. Medical officials are trained to look for this jewelry right away, and an accessory, such as a bracelet, could also let other people know of your parent’s dementia if the wandering occurs in a neighborhood or store. Even if your parent is in a nursing home or assisted living facility, investing in id bracelet could end up saving them from getting lost.

Notify neighbors and friends. If your elderly parent is living at home, it is important to let the neighbors know where your parent lives and of his or her dementia. Take a recent photo as well so they know who to look for in case of an emergency. Also tell friends of your parent’s disease in case you ever need help looking for your parent if he or she wanders off.

Don’t let your parent out of your sight in public places. Although it may seem like a nice thing to do, dropping your parent off at the door of a store while you park the car is not a good idea. If your parent suffers from dementia, it is likely that he or she won’t be there when you get to the storefront. It is also important to walk behind the person with dementia in public so you can always keep an eye on him or her. Elderly people can disappear very quickly if you turn away.

Take away the keys. Although it may seem like your parent can drive normally, if he or she is showing signs of dementia, the chances of an accident increase. Plus, it’s very possible that he or she may not know how to get somewhere, or worse, back home. This may only occur every now and then, but all it takes is one time of becoming lost behind the wheel. Find a way to get your parent to the store once a week. Also, the local senior center might have a bus to pick up elderly people. You may also want to look into assisted living at this point, so that your parent can be around people and have his or her needs met without having to drive anywhere.

How to Read a Food Label for Better Health

What you eat strongly influences your health and longevity.  Since much of our food is packaged, it’s important to read nutritional labels to get the healthiest food for you and your family.  Sometimes, though, reading food labels can be a bit confusing.  Here are a few tips to help make you more food label savvy when shopping for the week’s groceries.

food labelsStart by looking at the label located on the side or bottom of a food item. The nutritional facts featured are typically:

Serving Size: Many people overlook the serving size when purchasing and consuming a food item. The food label only lists nutritional information for one serving. You need to look at the serving size to determine the amount of fat and calories in the whole package. For example, a box of crackers may come with 2.5 servings, which means if the fat content is 6 grams, multiply that by 2.5.

Calories: Despite all the talk about carbs and fat, calories are what count for weight control. So the first thing to look for on a label is the number of calories per serving. The FDA’s new Calories Count program aims to make calorie information on labels easier to find by putting it in larger, bolder type.

Sodium: You’ll be surprised just how much sodium is in some foods – not good for people with high blood pressure. Just one or two foods can meet or even surpass a complete daily allowance of salt. Check your prescribed salt limit and shop accordingly. Keep in mind that 2,300 mg of salt is less than 1 teaspoon, and almost twice the recommended daily limit. Buy less processed foods to cut down on the salt.

Sugar: This is a type of carbohydrate that occurs naturally in food or is added to most processed foods. It comes under many different names (corn syrup, dextrose, glucose, etc.). If you’re diabetic, find out the amount of sugar and carbohydrates for you to safely consume in a day. To help control calories, choose foods with less than 5 grams of sugar per serving.

Dietary Fiber: You need at least 25 grams daily. A food that contains 5 grams per serving is considered high in fiber. Most fiber comes from whole grains, fruits and vegetables. So, instead of eating a candy bar for a snack, consider eating a high fiber oat or cereal bar. Just watch out for the added sugar.

Ingredient List: Manufacturers must list all of the ingredients contained in the product. The first ingredient listed is the most prevalent. This tells you the total composition and is important for people who have food allergies.

If you have a food allergy or other condition, it is important to take precaution when eating certain foods. Another thing you can do is wear a medical alert bracelet or necklace in case you eat something that reacts with your body. In the event of a severe reaction, a medical alert bracelet or necklace provides medical personnel with your medical information to facilitate treatment. Visit American Medical ID today to view the many colors and styles available. Remember, in an emergency, when you might not be able to speak for yourself, a medical ID bracelet or necklace speaks for you.

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