Ten Videos Every Senior Caregiver Should Watch

Ten Videos Every Senior Caregiver Should Watch

The below section is taken from the One Call Alert website blog, please click here for the original article.

Whether you are new to senior caregiving, looking for enhanced elder care training, or are looking for ways to support another caregiver, online education offers a world of opportunities. Here’s a collection of 10 great videos compiled by Melody Wilding of HealthWorks Collective that every caregiver should watch. Remember, these clips are no replacement for expert medical advice from your doctor or physician. 

  1. How to give an insulin shot – If you care for someone with diabetes, you’re probably wondering how to properly inject insulin. This video for CVS Pharmacy guides you through important steps for preparing and storing insulin and the steps to administering a shot.
  2. How to test your blood sugar – Testing blood sugar levels helps you and your loved one make informed decisions about diet, activity and even insulin dosing to most effectively manage diabetes. This video guide from Diabetes.co.uk shows you everything you’ll need to get starting and how to test blood glucose (sugar) levels.
  3. How to successfully manage medications – This video from the Alzheimer’s Foundation Education Series provides an emotional, real-life look at the importance of medication management. Caregivers play an invaluable role in assisting their loved ones in establishing daily routines for taking medication and communicating with healthcare providers about concerns and side effects. These lessons span beyond dementia caregiving and are useful to any caregiver with an elderly loved one living at home.
  4. How to protect your elderly loved one from fires – Does Mom or Dad forget to shut off the stove-top? For many reasons, older adults are at a higher risk of dying in a home fire. Find out how to protect your loved one with these safety tips.
  5. How to maintain balance & stay active at home – Exercise can improve a senior’s flexibility and strength, reducing risk of injury and guarding against the deleterious affects of illness or chronic disease.  Kathy Shillue of Rehabilitation Services at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston shows a series of exercises seniors can perform safely from the comfort of their own home.
  6. How to measure blood pressure – If you or your loved one suffers from high blood pressure, knowing how to achieve an BP accurate reading from home is essential to staying healthy and preventing problems before they start. Here physician and ConsumerReports medical expert, Marvin Lipman shows you how.
  7. How to help prevent trips and falls in home – For the elderly, trips and falls are the most common type of accident that occurs in the home. In this video, The Visiting Nurse Service of NY shows simple modifications you can make today to prevent falls and keep your loved one’s home environment a safe place.
  8. How to prevent bedsores – Bedsores, or pressure ulcers are a serious problem for many home-bound elders and are actually lesions caused by prolonged pressure to a part or side of the body. This video from LiveStrong will help you learn about treatments and symptoms.
  9. How to measure vital signs – During this video Sandi Flores, RN of Care and Compliance Group reviews step-by-step procedures for taking blood pressure, temperature, pulse, respiration, and weight. Documenting and reporting vitals signs are also addressed.
  10. How to live to 100 – To find the path to long life and health, Dan Buettner and team study the world’s “Blue Zones,” communities whose elders live with vim and vigor to record-setting age. In this absolutely fascinating TED talk, he shares the 9 common diet and lifestyle habits that keep aging people around the world spry past age 100.

 

Give the Gift of Peace of Mind with a Medical ID Bracelet

The greatest gift you can give yourself or others is peace of mind… and with the latest medical ID bracelets from American Medical ID, peace of mind never looked so good!

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Who should wear a medical ID?

If you have ongoing medical conditions, drug or food allergies, or are taking multiple medicines, you should wear a medical ID alert – we offer medical bracelets for women and medical bracelets for men alike. An engraved medical ID bracelet or necklace presenting a concise overview of your conditions, allergies and medicines will alert a doctor or medic before starting treatment. Informing medical personnel about your unique medical conditions and needs will greatly aid pre-hospital care.

Below is a partial list of ailments or persons who should wear a medical ID:
Diabetes
Heart disease (angina, atrial fibrillation, pacemakers)
Blood thinners/anticoagulants (Coumadin/Warfarin)
Drug allergies (such as Penicillin)
Food allergies (such as peanut)
Insect allergies (such as bee stings)
Alzheimer`s/Dementia/Memory impairment
Anemia
Ankylosing Spondylitis
Arrhythmias
Asthma
Autism
ADD/ADHD
Bariatric surgery patients
Blood disorders
Breathing disorders
Cerebral Palsy
Clinical trial patients
COPD
Cystic Fibrosis
Emphysema
Epilepsy, seizures
Hearing, sight or mentally impaired
Hypertension
Kidney failure
Mental health patients
Multiple Sclerosis
Parkinson`s Disease
People taking multiple medications
Rare diseases
Special needs children
Stroke risk
Surgery, transplant or cancer patients
Tourette Syndrome

Why are medical IDs critical?

Perhaps your doctor, nurse or pharmacist advised you to obtain and always wear a medical ID. Why is it important?

  • In an emergency, when you might not be able to speak for yourself, a medical ID bracelet or necklace speaks for you.
  • Symptoms of common ailments can easily be misdiagnosed. Prompt diagnosis is critical to effective treatment. A brief description of vital medical facts engraved on your medical ID ensures appropriate and timely medical care.
  • According to a published study, half of all medical errors occur because of mistakes made upon admission or discharge from the hospital.Wearing a medical ID protects against potentially harmful medical errors.
  • More than 95 percent of emergency responders look for a medical ID; more than 75 percent check for a medical ID immediately upon assessing the patient. If you`re wearing a medical ID, it won`t be missed.
  • Medical IDs can eliminate trips to the hospital, reduce unnecessary hospital admissions and prevent minor emergencies from becoming major ones. Medical IDs save lives! One day, a medical ID may save you.

CDC leads the National Diabetes Prevention Program

Nov27_PreventType2Learn more about how the National Diabetes Prevention Program can help you reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

About the Program

The National Diabetes Prevention Program encourages collaboration among federal agencies, community-based organizations, employers, insurers, health care professionals, academia, and other stakeholders to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes among people with prediabetes in the United States.

The inaugural partners of the National Diabetes Prevention Program were the YMCA and UnitedHealth Group. These partners were instrumental in starting the national program and continue to expand the reach of this evidence-based lifestyle program. CDC is enthusiastic about other organizations becoming involved in the National Diabetes Prevention Program. Most recently, Viridian Health Management, Inc. has agreed to partner with CDC and others to expand the reach of the program.

The CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program is an evidence-based lifestyle change program for preventing type 2 diabetes.

  • It can help people cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes in half.
  • The Diabetes Prevention Program research study showed that making modest behavior changes helped participants lose 5% to 7% of their body weight—that is 10 to 14 pounds for a 200-pound person.
  • These lifestyle changes reduced the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 58% in people with prediabetes.
  • Participants work with a lifestyle coach in a group setting to receive a 1-year lifestyle change program that includes 16 core sessions (usually 1 per week) and 6 post-core sessions (1 per month).

The National Diabetes Prevention Program teaches participants strategies for incorporating physical activity into daily life and eating healthy. Lifestyle coaches work with participants to identify emotions and situations that can sabotage their success, and the group process encourages participants to share strategies for dealing with challenging situations.

To find out if this program is offered in your community, click here.

 

Have Diabetes? Wear a Medical ID!

Nov25_MedicalIDJoslin Diabetes Center recommends all people with diabetes to wear a medical alert ID bracelet or necklace.

Importance of Wearing a Medical Alert ID Bracelet with Diabetes:

 “Medical alert bracelets enable rapid identification of patients with a number of illnesses, including diabetes, which can make them unable to communicate their illness to others,” according to Shamai Grossman, M.D., Director of the Cardiac Emergency Center and Clinical Decision Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is clinically affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center).

How They’re Beneficial for People with Diabetes:

Medical alert ID bracelets can be extremely important for people with diabetes.  Should you have a low blood glucose reaction and suddenly become confused or unresponsive, the bracelet allows immediate identification of the problem to both bystanders and paramedics.  The sooner the low blood glucose reactions can be identified, the sooner they can be treated.

Emergency department personnel also use medical alert ID bracelets to rapidly identify people with diabetes, particularly when they may not be able to express that they have diabetes on their own.  On arrival to an emergency department, one of the routine parts of the evaluation of the critically ill, unconscious, or disoriented patients is to remove their clothing to inspect the body for a cause of their sudden alteration, Grossman says.  In these situations, medical alert bracelets can be invaluable as a time saver.

Information People with Diabetes Should Put on a Medical Alert ID Bracelet:

The message on your medical alert bracelet should be concise and to the point.  “Diabetes” should be engraved boldly on one side.  The other side of the bracelet can have other information such as “insulin dependent” or “medication controlled,” he says.  Other important information can include:

  • An emergency contact number
  • The name of your physician
  • A referral to another place for more information, for example “see wallet card for a full medical history”

Tips to Help Manage Your Child’s Diabetes

Nov22_TipsChildrenManaging your child’s diabetes can be overwhelming, but Debbie Butler, L.I.C.S.W., C.D.E., Clinical Social Worker, Pediatrics and Behavioral and Mental Health in the Joslin Clinic, gives some tips on how to make it easier.

10 Tips to Help Manage Your Child’s Diabetes

  1. Parents need to take an active role in diabetes management tasks, regardless of the age of the child.
  2. Work with a health care team that is knowledgeable about pediatric diabetes. “At Joslin, we are lucky to have a large multi-disciplinary team of doctors, nurse educators, nutritionists, mental health specialists, child life specialists and other allied health professionals,” Butler says.
  3. See the health care team regularly – at least four times a year.
  4. Be honest with your health care team. Do not be afraid to tell them what is difficult for you and your child.
  5. Stay positive with your child. Tell him or her all of the things they are doing well, rather than focusing on what they need to work on.
  6. Be mindful of your facial expressions and what you say, especially when you see an out of range blood glucose.  Stress to your child that there is no “bad” blood glucose, because you want him or her to be honest about their blood glucose levels.
  7. Find time to check in with your child about diabetes management.
  8. Make sure that you talk about non-diabetes issues as well, like you do with your other children.  For example, when your children come home from school, ask them all about their day rather than just focusing on the blood glucose levels of the child with diabetes.
  9. Make sure your child does everything that he or she would have done if your child was not diagnosed with diabetes (ex. sports, sleepovers, parties, etc.).
  10. Prepare healthy foods for the entire family. A healthy mean plan for someone with diabetes is the same for someone without diabetes.

“Medical alert bracelets enable rapid identification of patients with a number of illnesses, including diabetes, which can make them unable to communicate their illness to others,” according to Shamai Grossman, M.D., Director of the Cardiac Emergency Center and Clinical Decision Unit at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center. (Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center is clinically affiliated with the Joslin Diabetes Center).

Thank you to the Joslin Diabetes Center for the interview.

Surviving the Holidays with Diabetes

Nov20_HolidaySurvivalParties can pose a challenge for people with diabetes. Celebrations like birthdays, anniversaries, and the holidays present a minefield of situations to navigate.  Without a little preplanning, you risk throwing your diabetes off course and sending a joyous occasion into a healthcare calamity.

Holidays

New Years: You may need less basal evening insulin should you have champagne on December 31.  This would help to stave off starting the New Year with hypoglycemia.  Carry emergency glucose
tablets and a protein bar.  You might try a small snack before arriving to the party to avoid an all night graze.
Eid al-Adha (the Festival of Sacrifice and the most important feast honored by Muslims worldwide, 70 days after Ramadan): It commemorates Prophet Ibrahim’s willingness to sacrifice his son Ishmal for Allah.  It concludes with millions of Muslims taking the pilgrimage to Mecca, Saudi Arabia.  When sharing two-thirds of your meals with the poor, you will need less insulin and medication due to
limited food intake.  Consider limiting koftas.
Chinese New Year: End of January-mid-February (date varies). Traditions require people to practice various customs to promote prosperity (like sharing tangerines and oranges to symbolize abundant happiness) and ward off bad spirits (such as lighting firecrackers and wearing the color red).  It’s a week-long celebration, filled with all kinds of carbs.  Notable mention goes to a togetherness-candy tray.  Pace yourself and share money-filled red envelopes (“lay see”).
Easter: If you’re fasting for church service, you may need to reduce or hold your morning diabetes medications (check with your healthcare provider first) and pass on the chocolate bunny ears.
• Ramadan (Islamic month of fasting, dates change about 13 days earlier in each consecutive year):
People with diabetes are not required or advised to fast.  If you wish to follow tradition, get an individualized plan together with your healthcare provider to accommodate the pre-dawn to sunset fast to prevent hypo or hyperglycemia, and dehydration.
Thanksgiving: Bring a healthy choice to share, have a little of everything instead of a lot, build exercise into the day, and ask about the best medicine approach to take.
Bodhi Day (Buddah’s Enlightenment, oftentimes observed 12/8): Choose a small portion of rice and milk, count your carbs and act accordingly. Consider adding a protein.  If meditating for hours, you may need less medicine and a way to prevent dehydration.
Virgin of Guadalupe (honors the patron saint of Mexico / patroness of the Americas 12/12):
Adjust medicines to handle the several hours of morning fast followed by high carb content foods (champurrado — a hot, thick, chocolate milk with corn flour added, tamales and sweet bread). You may need less evening insulin, or to hold your morning medications until you have food, and extra quick-acting insulin to cover the extra carbs.  Bring quick acting sugar if you start to feel dizzy or low.
Hanukkah (sometimes spelled Chanukah, the Jewish festival of lights, occurring anytime between late November and late December): Enjoy the stuffed beef brisket or fowl, try baking the potato latkes instead of frying in oil or substitute with other winter vegetables. Try whole wheat challah bread instead of egg-enriched yeast and limit the honey-sweetened desserts.  Plan for extra walking
or extra medications to combat the extra carbs.
Christmas (12/25): Bring quick acting sugar with you to church (whether it be midnight or early mass) as lows can occur in the middle of a sermon.  Suggest non-food related gifts. You can also accept all neighborly gifts of baked goods to share with your friends and family. Have a snack if the main meal feast is delayed. You may need more bolus insulin to account for the big meal. Ask for a donation to be made towards diabetes research in lieu of giving you a gift.
Boxing Day (also known as St. Stephen’s Day, 12/26): Go easy on the buffet line.  Fish around for the dime in the plum pudding and limit the cream.  Other tips about alcohol and exercise apply here!
Kwanzaa (African American / Pan-African celebration, 12/26-1/1): Have the karamu (yams, sesame seeds, collard greens and hot peppers) early in the evening if you also plan to celebrate New Year’s Eve.  Factor candied yams into bolus insulin dose.  Watch alcohol intake in the passing of a communal unity cup.

Also, remember to always wear your medical ID bracelet. Even if you are attending a party with people who know about your diabetes, you should always be prepared and wear your medical ID.

 

Managing your Diabetes

Nov18_managediabetesAs part of our annual coverage of American Diabetes Month we’d like to provide some steps to managing your diabetes from our colleagues at the National Diabetes Education Program.  Many people avoid the long-term problems of diabetes by taking good care of themselves.

Work with your health care team to reach your ABC goals (A1C, Blood Pressure, Cholesterol): 

  • Use your diabetes meal plan.  If you do not have one, ask your health care team about one.
  • Make healthy food choices such as fruits and vegetables, fish, lean meats, chicken or turkey without the skin, dry peas or beans, whole grains, and low-fat or skim milk and cheese.
  • Keep fish and lean meat and poultry portion to about 3 ounces (or the size of a deck of cards).  Bake, broil, or grill it.
  • Eat foods that have less fat and salt.
  • Eat foods with more fiber such as whole grains cereals, breads, crackers, rice, or pasta.
  • Get 30 to 60 minutes of physical activity on most days of the week.  Brisk walking is a great way to move more.
  • Stay at a healthy weight by using your meal plan and moving more.
  • Ask for help if you feel down.  A mental health counselor, support group, member of the clergy, friend, or family member who will listen to your concerns may help you feel better.
  • Learn to cope with stress.  Stress can raise your blood glucose (blood sugar). While it is hard to remove stress from your life, you can learn to handle it.
  • Stop smoking.  Ask for help to quit.
  • Take medicines even when you feel good.  Ask your doctor if you need aspirin to prevent a heart attack or stroke.  Tell your doctor if you cannot afford your medicines or if you have any side effects.
  • Check your feet every day for cuts, blisters, red spots, and swelling.  Call your health care team right away about any sores that do not go away.
  • Brush your teeth and floss every day to avoid problems with your mouth, teeth, or gums
  • Check your blood glucose (blood sugar).  You may want to test it one or more times a day. Use the card at the back of this booklet to keep a record of your blood glucose numbers.  Be sure to take this record to your doctor visits.
  • Check your blood pressure if your doctor advises.
  • Report any changes in your eyesight to your doctor.

Actions you could take:

  • Talk with your health care team about your blood glucose targets.  Ask how and when to test your blood glucose and how to use the results to manage your diabetes.
  • Discuss how your self-care plan is working for you each time you visit your health care team.

 

Give the Gift of Peace of Mind this year with Medical ID under $30!

American Medical ID now has a special gift ideas page where every product is under $30, engraving is absolutely free, and, if you order now, will be delivered in time for Christmas!

Who should wear a medical ID?

If you have ongoing medical conditions, drug or food allergies, or are taking multiple medicines, you should wear a medical ID alert – we offer medical bracelets for women and medical bracelets for men alike.  An engraved medical ID bracelet or necklace presenting a concise overview of your conditions, allergies and medicines will alert a doctor or medic before starting treatment.  Informing medical personnel about your unique medical conditions and needs will greatly aid pre-hospital care.

Why is it important?

  • In an emergency, when you might not be able to speak for yourself, a medical ID bracelet or necklace speaks for you.
  • Symptoms of common ailments can easily be misdiagnosed. Prompt diagnosis is critical to effective treatment. A brief description of vital medical facts engraved on your medical ID ensures appropriate and timely medical care.
  • According to a published study, half of all medical errors occur because of mistakes made upon admission or discharge from the hospital. Wearing a medical ID protects against potentially harmful medical errors.
  • More than 95 percent of emergency responders look for a medical ID; more than 75 percent check for a medical ID immediately upon assessing the patient. If you`re wearing a medical ID, it won’t be missed.
  • Medical IDs can eliminate trips to the hospital, reduce unnecessary hospital admissions and prevent minor emergencies from becoming major ones. Medical IDs save lives! One day, a medical ID may save you.

Meet Buckshot Bob, the Type 1 Diabetes Medical ID Bracelet for Kids

American Medical ID is now offering an adorable and functional medical ID bracelet for young children with type 1 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes in children is a condition in which your child’s pancreas no longer produces the insulin your child needs to survive, and you’ll need to replace the missing insulin. Type 1 diabetes in children used to be known as juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes.

The diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in children can be overwhelming at first. Suddenly, you and your child — depending on his or her age — must learn how to give injections, count carbohydrates and monitor blood sugar.

Although type 1 diabetes in children requires consistent care, advances in blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery have improved the daily management of type 1 diabetes in children.

The Medical IDs are usually worn as a bracelet or a necklace. Traditional IDs are etched with basic, key health information about the person, and some IDs now include compact USB drives that can carry a person’s full medical record, such as the fact that they have diabetes and use insulin. Emergency medical personnel are trained to look for a medical ID.

Health Insurance: Protections for People with Diabetes

Nov11_DiabetesCostsThe Affordable Care Act, passed in 2010, includes a number of changes to improve access to health insurance for individuals and families and make coverage more affordable.  Some parts of the law are already in place and people with diabetes are already benefiting from them, while many other protections go into effect in 2014.

The following information excerpted from the American Diabetes Association website.  For the complete article, click here.

Protections Already in Effect

  • Coverage for Children: Job-based plans and new individual plans cannot deny children coverage because of diabetes or any other pre-existing condition.
  • Coverage for Young Adults: Young adults can stay on their parent’s insurance plan until age 26 as long as the policy covers dependents.
  • Free Preventive Care: Most health plans are required to provide certain health services aimed at preventing disease at no charge. This includes diabetes screenings for adults with high blood pressure; cholesterol screenings; obesity screening and counseling; diabetes screening for pregnant women; and some preventive services for children. Certain preventive services are also free for people with Medicare, including medical nutrition therapy for people with diabetes and an annual wellness visit to develop (or update) a personal prevention plan.
  • No Lifetime Dollar Limits on Coverage: Health insurance plans cannot set a dollar limit on the amount the insurance company will spend on “essential health benefits” over the course of the time a person is enrolled in that plan.
  • Limits on Drug Costs for People with Medicare: Medicare beneficiaries with high prescription drug costs that put them in the coverage gap (also called “donut hole”) get a 52.5% discount on covered brand-name drugs while in the gap in 2013 and 2014.  Additional savings will occur each year for people in the gap until 2020, when the coverage gap won’t exist anymore.
  • Summary of Benefits and Coverage: Individuals have the right to get a plain language summary (called a Summary of Benefits and Coverage, or SBC) of a health plan’s benefits to help them better understand the plan’s coverage and compare plans. Plans must provide the SBC when a person is shopping for coverage, when there is a major change in benefits, or anytime a person asks for it. The SBC must include a general coverage example for managing type 2 diabetes. This example provides a snapshot of how much the plan might pay for medical care for a sample patient with type 2 diabetes. The example will not estimate your specific costs for managing your diabetes, but will help in comparing different plans.  Individuals can also ask for a copy of a glossary of terms used in health coverage. People who don’t speak English may be able to get the SBC and glossary in their native language upon request.

Protections Effective in 2014

  • Coverage for People with Diabetes: Starting in 2014, job-based plans and new individual plans aren’t allowed to deny coverage, charge more, or refuse to cover treatments due to a pre-existing condition, such as diabetes.
  • New Health Insurance Marketplaces: Starting October 1, 2013, a new Health Insurance Marketplace (Marketplace) will be available in every state where individuals, families, and small businesses can buy health insurance. Plans in the Marketplace must meet certain requirements for benefits, consumer protections, and cost to the consumer. Coverage bought in a Marketplace will be eeffective as early as January 1, 2014. Initial open enrollment starts on October 1, 2013 and ends on March 31, 2014 and there will be a yearly open enrollment period every fall. Trained individuals called “Navigators” will be available to help individuals understand their coverage options and the enrollment process. Assistance will be available in-person, over the phone, and online, and will be available in multiple languages. For more information on the Marketplace and Navigators in your state, call 1-800-318-2596 or visit www.healthcare.gov.  The American Diabetes Association also has a fact sheet on the new Marketplaces available at www.diabetes.org/HealthInsuranceMarketplaces or by calling 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383).
  • Financial Assistance: Financial assistance to make health insurance more affordable in the new Marketplace will be available for individuals and families who meet certain income requirements and do not qualify for a affordable job-based coverage or certain other types of coverage.
  • Medicaid Expansion: It is up to each state to decide whether to extend Medicaid eligibility to people earning up to 138% of the federal poverty level (approximately $15,856.20 for an individual and $32,499 for a family of four in 2013.)
  • Essential Health Benefits: A minimum set of “essential health benefits” like hospitalization, prescription drugs, preventive services, and chronic disease management must be covered in all new individual and small group plans (including all plans sold in the new Marketplace) starting in 2014.  •••••Tip: The specific benefits and what you pay within these categories of services can vary by state and by plan. When shopping for health insurance, it is important to ask if the plan covers the diabetes supplies, services, and prescription medications you need, and what it costs.
  • No Annual Dollar Limits on Essential Health Benefits: Most health plans cannot set a dollar limit on what they spend on “essential health benefits” for an individual’s care during a given year.

Other Changes Coming in 2014

Starting in January 2014, most individuals must have health insurance that is considered “minimum essential coverage” or qualify for an exemption. Otherwise, the individual will owe a tax penalty during the following year. Plans purchased in the Health Insurance Marketplaces as well as job-based coverage, Medicare, Medicaid, state Children’s Health Insurance Programs (CHIP), TRICARE and the Veterans health care program, and certain other coverage meet this requirement. If health insurance
is not considered a affordable for an individual, that person will qualify for an exemption from the tax penalty. Learn more about the new individual requirement at www.healthcare.gov.

Where To Find More Information

  • For more information about these insurance protections and programs, call 1-800-318-2596 or visit www.healthcare.gov.
  • For more information on the Health Insurance Marketplace and Navigators in your state, call 1-800-318-2596 or visit www.healthcare.gov. Assistance is available in multiple languages by calling 1-800-318-2596. The American Diabetes Association also has a fact sheet on the new Marketplaces available at www.diabetes.org/HealthInsuranceMarketplaces or by calling 1-800-DIABETES (342-2383).
  • You can also contact your state’s Department of Insurance for information about insurance requirements and consumer protections in your state. Information for state insurance departments is available at: www.naic.org/state_web_map.htm.
  • Some states have Consumer Assistance Programs offering direct help to individuals with problems or questions about their health insurance. These programs also help you file an appeal when an insurance claim is denied. Find out if your state has a consumer assistance program here: www.healthcare.gov/how-can-i-get-consumer-help-if-i-have-insurance/.

Thank you to the American Diabetes Association for providing this detailed synopsis.

 

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