World Alzheimer's Day and Medical IDs

World Alzheimer's Day

Each year on September 21, Alzheimer’s disease research and support organizations come together to raise awareness about the condition as part of World Alzheimer’s Day. Because the person diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease often requires care, the community of supporters extends well beyond those diagnosed with the disease.

What is Alzheimer's Disease?

Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia, is a progressive, degenerative disease that causes loss of memory and the ability to perform many independent tasks. The disease was named for the German scientist who identified it in the early 1900s.

The disease is commonly associated with aging, but dementia is not a normal part of the aging process. In Alzheimer’s disease, abnormal protein configurations, called plaques and tangles, lead to deterioration and loss of brain cells. It is a challenging disease to experience, because people affected tend to lose pieces of them slowly over time.

Scientists have discovered some genes associated with developing the disease, and have linked certain lifestyles with an increased risk. People who have more sedentary, less mentally-engaged lives may have a higher chance of developing the disease. Adults over 65 are most at risk for developing the disease, as are women, who tend to live longer than men.

Worldwide Statistics

Worldwide, more than 45 million people have dementia, with 7.7 million new cases diagnosed each year. Of these, about 65 percent are attributed to Alzheimer’s disease.

Alzheimer’s and Medical IDs

A medical ID engraved with the person’s name, an emergency contact, and medical conditions provides valuable information to emergency responders. In the case of Alzheimer’s disease and related illnesses, such a tool can be a vital means of identification since research shows that 60 percent of people with dementia become lost at some point during the progression of the disease. Symptoms such as memory loss and confusion put them in harm’s way if not found quickly and returned to safety. Among the product selection are IDs with clasps that require two hands to remove, making it more difficult for people to remove.

Sources: Mayo Clinic, World Health Organization, Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s